Which Potential Vaccines Cause Autism?

child getting vaccines

Guide to whether vaccines cause autism and which immunizations parents are most concerned about. I would like to first say that I am not recommending whether you should or should not vaccinate your child.

However, this is a very controversial topic surrounding the autism population and I think it is important for concerns to be made known so that the truth, whatever that may be, is discovered.

The first claimed link between the Measles-Mumps-Rubella/MMR vaccine and autism was originally stated by Andrew Wakefield, a surgeon and medical researcher. Although the results of the study were later discredited, many parents still claim to have seen a dramatic change in their child shortly after he/she received the immunization.

Adverse Effects

Despite not having scientific evidence that vaccines cause autism, there are some alarming adverse effects listed that are said to be the result of receiving a vaccination. The CDC website lists DTaP side effects and MMR side effects, although said to be uncommon or rare, that includes seizures and permanent brain damage.

Many children with autism frequently have seizure disorders and isn’t it probable that one of the underlying causes of autism is permanent brain damage? My other question is that if they can’t directly attribute the cause or triggering of autism symptoms to something else, then how can they be certain the trigger isn’t a vaccination?

Vaccine Ingredients

Another questionable vaccination would be the influenza vaccines that still contain the ingredient thimerosal (mercury) and potentially are given to a pregnant mother. There are versions of this that do not contain mercury available, so knowing which brand your doctor uses is a good idea.

Finally, there is the debate regarding the possibility that aborted fetal tissue in vaccines cause autism. According to the Sound Choice Pharmaceutical Institute (SCPI) there are three years in particular that showed a dramatic increase in autism trends. Those years are 1981, 1988, and 1995.

An article written on World Net Daily shows how those years appear to correlate with the initiation of the human fetal rubella and MMR II (containing fetal tissue) in 1979, the initiation of a second dose of the MMR II in 1988, and the initiation of the chicken pox immunization (also containing fetal tissue) in 1995.

Do vaccines cause autism? What is it about vaccines that may be causing these adverse effects and why does it affect some and not others? Read about this and more on my page with further discussions on The Autism-Vaccines Debate


1. Stanek, J. (2010). Vaccines made with fetal cells causing autism? World Net Daily. 9-7-11.

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